Game design – Seraphic Blue http://seraphicblue.net/ Thu, 12 May 2022 06:09:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://seraphicblue.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/sep-150x150.png Game design – Seraphic Blue http://seraphicblue.net/ 32 32 Combining computer programming and creativity, the new BS in game design and development releases its first promotion https://seraphicblue.net/combining-computer-programming-and-creativity-the-new-bs-in-game-design-and-development-releases-its-first-promotion/ Wed, 11 May 2022 21:22:29 +0000 https://seraphicblue.net/combining-computer-programming-and-creativity-the-new-bs-in-game-design-and-development-releases-its-first-promotion/ Computer game images created by 2022 graduates of the Game Design and Development major. Established in fall 2020, the BS in Game Design and Development in the School of Information, equips undergraduate students with the skills and real-world experience needed to create virtual interactive environments that span on all devices and platforms. In the major, […]]]>

Computer game images created by 2022 graduates of the Game Design and Development major.

Established in fall 2020, the BS in Game Design and Development in the School of Information, equips undergraduate students with the skills and real-world experience needed to create virtual interactive environments that span on all devices and platforms.

In the major, students learn to create games for entertainment but also virtual reality simulations for training, education, healthcare, and other purposes. For example, Lila and Ren Bozgeyikli, senior faculty members in game design and development, study virtual reality simulations for people with traumatic brain injuries in the Extended Reality and Games Lab.

This spring, the first class of five students are graduating in game design and development, and two more students are graduating this summer. Students shared how the mix of technical skills and creativity offered in the major made it an ideal choice for their career goals.

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A screenshot of an image of “Dungeons of Akazarn” from Javier Perez’s Capstone Project.

US Navy Veteran, Javier Perez changed his major from computer science to game design and development once it became available.

“Once I started taking game programming classes, it quickly became clear that this department was interested in letting me experiment and grow based on my own gaming interests,” said Perez, who is studying in computer science. “These were honestly the hardest classes I’ve taken, but they were also the most rewarding and fun I’ve had in college.”

Perez said his interactions with lecturer Drew Castalia had the biggest impact on his college career. “He ignited my passion for learning and encouraged me to dive into advanced programming architecture,” Perez said.

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A screenshot of an image of “Fatal Strike” from the wrap-up project by Amir Ameri and Brendan Schofield.

Amir Ameriwho double majored in game design and development and computer science, is also president of the university’s video game developer club.

“I chose to major in Game Design and Development because I have a passion for game design and thought it would be a great way to sharpen my skills,” Ameri said. “I enjoyed working on hands-on projects for months and then being able to show the finished product to players and see what they think of it.”

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A screenshot on the home page of “Stellar Drift”, Nathan Whinnery’s flagship project.

Nathan Winnery has always enjoyed playing and creating his own games, ranging from backyard games when he was little to “simple games using another game’s free/creative build mode”, he said.

Whinnery started at UArizona in engineering but wanted to move into something more gaming-related. He switched to computer science, but when the Game Design and Development major became available, “I immediately changed with little ‘hesitation”.

“One of my favorite parts of majoring was making games with freedom,” said Whinnery, who majored in computer science and math. “Some classes have an open-ended approach, like ‘make any game you want, any way you want, but it has to include ‘a, b, c’ so now we can solve problems in different ways.”

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A screenshot of ISTA 451’s “Out of the Box” project, which Brendan Schofield and Amir Ameri worked on.

Brendan Schofield first majored in electrical engineering and then computer science before choosing game design and development due to the emphasis on creativity.

“ISTA 251 was the class that really roped me into the major for sure, where we basically studied the science of how to make games fun for players,” Schofield said.

“I decided to stay with GD&D because of the amazing teachers and speakers, being able to create fun and creative games in the classroom, and continuing to learn programming,” Schofield said. “It’s also a plus when the other students in the program are just as passionate about creativity as you are.”

And after?

Perez is applying for various game development jobs that will allow him to work on “fun and rewarding” projects.

Ameri also wants to get a game design job after graduation. “I want to work my way through the industry until I can be a designer on a competitive fighting game, especially on the new fighting game Riot,” Ameri said.

Whinnery hopes to teach game design and develop his own games.

“Long term, I’d like to be an environmental artist for a game company – it’s the people who take various assets (trees, boxes, buildings, anything visible inside a game world) and create the physical levels that players explore,” Whinnery said.

Schofield says his career plans after graduation are still up in the air, but he wants to “work on my own skills and build a portfolio.” He hopes to intern at a game company or work as a freelancer.

Schofield is happy he decided to major in game design and development: “I think it’s an amazing program and I’ve never learned so much in my life.”

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Kirby’s Dream Land draws a perfect circle of game design https://seraphicblue.net/kirbys-dream-land-draws-a-perfect-circle-of-game-design/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 06:09:56 +0000 https://seraphicblue.net/kirbys-dream-land-draws-a-perfect-circle-of-game-design/ Kirby’s Dream Land is a perfect circle of a video game. What do I mean by that? Prepare to graduate in Kirbology, my friend. Maybe an art degree, too. I’m not a certified educator, but I’ll sign something for you if you want. Anyone can draw a circle, right? Well, if you’ve ever been drawn […]]]>

Kirby’s Dream Land is a perfect circle of a video game. What do I mean by that? Prepare to graduate in Kirbology, my friend. Maybe an art degree, too. I’m not a certified educator, but I’ll sign something for you if you want.

Anyone can draw a circle, right? Well, if you’ve ever been drawn to art, you’re probably aware of the trials and tribulations that really come with drawing a circle. I’m not just talking about drawing something round or rounded. I’m talking about a circle that’s genuine and honest with God. No distorted curves or uneven symmetry. Pure and unfiltered roundness. Despite its simplicity, drawing a truly circular circle requires some technique and a steady hand honed through practice.

The Kirby games embody this principle, and not just because Kirby is himself a circle. Kirby walks the line between being as approachable as drawing a circle while often burying bigger challenges beneath the surface. This plan was clearly laid out from the very first game in the series.

Director Masahiro Sakurai aimed to make Kirby’s Dream Land a “game that anyone could enjoy”. Mr. Sakurai and his team at HAL Lab tackled this challenge from multiple angles, starting with the player character himself. Kirby exists as an inherently accessible character – when you draw him, you might as well draw the ever-elusive circle itself. Its simple design easily stimulates creativity. A slew of cute in-game animations and expressions sell the character in a universal way that almost anyone can appreciate.

Kirby’s charming simplicity matches the basic design of the game. True to purpose, I would describe Kirby’s Dream Land as a very relaxed platformer that anyone could enjoy. This certainly avoids taxing the player too much in terms of difficulty, but difficulty alone does not define the game. Kirby’s Dream Land ensures its friendly nature by equipping the player with mechanics that diverge from its platforming contemporaries.

Dream Land does not emphasize offense or speed through levels. In fact, the player has relatively little control over the pace of the game. Kirby waddles at a constant speed – not too fast, but not too slow. Making Kirby suck up enemies stops him in his tracks. This mechanism turns the game into a constant stopping and starting process.

Kirby’s relationship with enemies forms the basis of what I call the Kinda Innovative and Reaction-Based Yeet (KIRBY) system. Essentially, enemies serve as both obstacles and resources. Rather than just focusing on killing them, what you really need to think about is the next step. Kirby pauses on consuming baddies not to slow down the game arbitrarily, but to allow you to watch the screen for incoming enemies or dangers. Once your quarry has been neatly tidied up, you can then shoot the victim with your newly acquired ammo. Yeet is the technical term for this process, to clear up any confusion.

Effective use of the KIRBY system defines gameplay, from navigating stages to pulling a Waddle Dee alongside boss battles. None of the bosses will allow Kirby to suck them in through I guess sheer force of will, so these fights best exemplify the reaction element of the game. The bosses freely unleash their attacks and Kirby has no other choice but to dodge them until he identifies something to vacuum up, be it apples against the giant tree or boxes being pushed by Lolo and Lala.

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Someone has to explain to me how this box works, by the way. The safest way to grab these boxes without taking damage seems to be to suck them up from behind Lolo or Lala as they push her, so do they become intangible or is this the real first Kirby 3D game? More importantly, let’s say there really is a 3D space here and the limitations of the game just force us to adopt a 2D perspective; Why is pushing a box at Kirby a threat? Dodge it, man.

Either way, the way Kirby interacts with his enemies conditions the player to move forward at a relaxed pace reacting to incoming threats rather than rushing at them. From here, the game further asks the player to slow down with its gates and alternate paths that lead to health, bonuses, or life. Often they just slow you down too. I mean, let’s be real – the items are cool and all, but this is the kind of game where they’re largely useless and it’s a lot faster to ignore all the goodies.

Basically, if you’re hanging out at Dream Land, you’re there to relax and take your time. Despite this, the game does not lack nuance.

Although the KIRBY system remains integrated into many sections of the game, Kirby doesn’t really need to engage with it to fight his enemies. Pressing up causes Kirby to inhale enough air to inflate (or at least I think that’s what? Maybe you’re actually triggering some sort of biological function. My degree is in Kirbology and not in Kirbiology). While floating, you can release inhaled air in puffs that damage most enemies. Taking advantage of the puff allows you to avoid much of the wasted momentum involved in performing the KIRBY system correctly. It’s also mandatory to defeat those weird fake Kirby monsters that explode if you try to inhale them.

If you’re a real speed demon, you can also choose to just float past lots of enemies and obstacles. The float mechanic actually reveals an uncomfortable truth about Kirby’s Dream Land: although it’s a platformer, it’s not really a platformer. At least not in the traditionally expected sense.

An extremely forgiving ability makes sense in such a low-stakes game, but obviously doesn’t make sense to completely eradicate platforming from platforming. Considering how this mechanic limits level design, Dream Land only really challenges your ability to avoid falling in two ways: making the bottomless pit very wide or forcing you to move upwards.

I appreciate how these sections force you to rethink the mechanics. Normally, upon seeing an enemy, your survival instinct kicks in and you’ll just want to shoot a blast of air or suck it in, but that will knock Kirby off. You need to balance your attacks with quick recoveries in order to stay in the air without falling too much, otherwise you will constantly erase your own progress. I can’t say if it really counts as a platformer, but they found a way to make floating interesting, so I’m enjoying it nonetheless.

Of course, none of the enemies or vertical shafts really hinder your journey through Dream Land. After going through the five steps, it’s over and done in about twenty minutes. Job well done and it’s time to move on, isn’t it? Bad. I thought you were serious about earning your degree! Of course, it’s not over!

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That’s right, we’ve come full circle to talk a little more about circles. Much like drawing a circle, just about anyone can complete Kirby’s Dream Land. Completing the extra game, however, is the real deal. If you want to complete your circle, really complete your degree in Kirbology, you must put everything you have learned to the test here.

Remember a little while ago I was talking rubbish about how you don’t need to get the items because the game is so easy? Never mind that. The extra game takes no prisoners and you’ll need all the help you can get.

Extra Game improves enemy damage as you would expect, but it also completely reworks the existing game, with new enemies. Many of these enemies attack on sight and will rush at you with little time to react. The tiny umbrellas that Waddle Dees floats on screen are no longer cute details; they are trained killing machines that will attack and assassinate you. If the KIRBY system hasn’t trained you to be cautious, the constant onslaught of enemies in this mode will definitely make you think twice before scrolling.

Sometimes this mode cleverly pushes the game to its limits and requires mastery of a plethora of scenarios. At other times, it feels like the developers are playing a joke on the player. One area in particular involves you flying down a vertical shaft when suddenly a coconut materializes out of thin air and crushes your head. No way to react, just random damage. Better luck next time. By the time you reach the fourth stage, it becomes apparent that this mode was created by bona fide sufferers. I don’t care how good you think you are at these baby games, the cloud boss with the big eye is absolutely going to mess you up.

Nobody said that the Extra Game would be easy of course: that’s the whole point. Kirby’s Dream Land, and Kirby as a series, may have earned a reputation as a spring breeze, a walk in the park, or a piece of cake, but that’s just a front to bring people in. . The real, perfectly round Kirby requires perfection, time and effort. And just like a series of intense circle-drawing exercises, your hand may hurt a little by the time you’re done.

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Game Design Major Launches 3D Animation Business https://seraphicblue.net/game-design-major-launches-3d-animation-business/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 09:20:44 +0000 https://seraphicblue.net/game-design-major-launches-3d-animation-business/ By Horace Holloman ATLANTA — Joel Mack has gone from playing video games set in virtual worlds to working with a host of high-profile clients to bring their visions — and their characters — to life. When his father brought home a PlayStation 2 console and The Matrix game, based on the 1999 sci-fi film […]]]>

By Horace Holloman

ATLANTA — Joel Mack has gone from playing video games set in virtual worlds to working with a host of high-profile clients to bring their visions — and their characters — to life.

When his father brought home a PlayStation 2 console and The Matrix game, based on the 1999 sci-fi film about life in a simulated reality, Mack fell in love with virtual reality and game design. .

Through the company he co-founded, Actor Capture, he helps individuals and businesses create “digital humans” – 2D and 3D animated characters that look realistic.

Mack, who graduated from Georgia State this spring with a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies in game design and development, said getting into the game at an early age wasn’t just about enjoying a hobby. . It was a life changing experience.

“I feel like the game has kept me out of trouble and kept me away from bad influences,” he said. “It really changed the trajectory of my life.”

Since its inception in 2020, Actor Capture has worked with high-powered companies such as Warner Bros. Studios, BET and FOX on motion capture for advanced animation projects.

The Capture actor also worked with Grammy-winning rap artist Cardi B for an episode of her Facebook series, “Cardi Tries.” In the episode, Cardi B is transformed into a playable game character using motion capture technology. The episode has accumulated over 5 million views.

Mack started at Georgia State as an economics major. A class project took him down the rabbit hole of technology and academic offerings at the Creative Media Industries Institute (CMII).

At CMII, students have rare access to cutting-edge technology and instruction from faculty who are highly experienced in using new technologies at the highest commercial levels. CMII’s facilities include a performance capture studio with multi-camera motion capture, volumetric and virtual production technologies, and advanced capture software systems.

“I didn’t realize there were so many tools at Georgia State,” Mack said. “It all started to fall into place, and it opened up so many ideas for me.”

Mack worked on several virtual reality-based projects while at Georgia State, including a business card that lets users view a 3D display of the person or business by pointing their phone at the map. The effect is reminiscent of the scene from “Star Wars” when Princess Leia calls for help transmitted by a robot.

“Virtual business cards have been created before, but there haven’t been volumetric business cards like this where you can have an exact replica of the person,” Mack said. “Every reaction I’ve heard is, ‘Wow, that’s cool,’ or ‘That’s amazing.’ It’s the future.

After graduation, Mack plans to join his father in the real estate business while continuing to build his Actor Capture business.

“I’m 23 and I’m getting into these industries and trying to get my name out there,” he said.

Photo by Carolyn Richardson

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